Torture Victim Protection Act

0 Comments

The Torture Victim Protection Act (TVPA) is a United States federal law that allows victims of torture and extrajudicial killings to bring civil lawsuits against the perpetrators in the United States. The TVPA was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1991 and signed into law by President George H.W. Bush.

The main purpose of the Torture Victim Protection Act is to provide a civil remedy for victims of torture and extrajudicial killings committed by individuals acting in an official capacity or under the color of law of any foreign nation. The law enables victims to seek damages in U.S. courts against the individuals responsible for their suffering.

Under the TVPA, victims or their representatives can file a lawsuit in a U.S. federal court against the alleged torturers. The law authorizes compensatory damages for the victim’s pain and suffering, as well as economic losses resulting from the torture or extrajudicial killing. Punitive damages may also be awarded in certain cases.

It’s worth noting that the Torture Victim Protection Act applies to acts committed by foreign individuals or entities, and it does not cover acts committed by U.S. officials within the United States. Additionally, the law has certain limitations, such as the requirement that the alleged perpetrator be present in the United States for a lawsuit to proceed.

Overall, the Torture Victim Protection Act is intended to provide a legal avenue for victims of torture and extrajudicial killings to seek justice and compensation in the United States when their human rights have been violated abroad.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *