Review of Pakistan: A Personal History by Imran Khan

Imran Khan does in fact view life as a journey toward reaching one objective after another. In his book, he covers everything from cricket to creating Pakistan’s first cuttings edge cancer hospital, a university, and how he got the idea to get into politics.

Imran Khan does in fact view life as a journey toward reaching one objective after another. In his book, he covers everything from cricket to creating Pakistan’s first cuttings edge cancer hospital, a university, and how he got the idea to get into politics.

Imran Khan wrote the book “Pakistan: A Personal History” in 2011, at a time when PTI was just starting to gain traction. Because of this, it was rather evident to me that the book was discussing the state of the nation’s politics. I must admit that when I discovered it to be the opposite of what I had anticipated, I was surprised. I get the impression that Khan was making an effort to explain Pakistan to Westerners.

Modes:StandardOne may not agree with everything that Khan has to say, but one is forced to admit that Khan has passion, drive and determination for his cause. It’s an amazing read for people to get an overview of Pakistan’s past and present. In his book, he talks about his early life along with the history of Pakistan. He starts from his childhood and sheds light on his various pursuits in life, cricket, politics & philanthropy and from there on his continued experiences that have shaped up his thoughts and beliefs. The long account of his struggles after his mother’s death, almost uninterested in politics, playboy of cricket world who leaves the life of rock and roll for a noble cause, in between marries Jemima and then falls apart is fascinating to read.Even if one doesn’t agree with all that Khan says, one cannot deny his enthusiasm, drive, and dedication to his cause. It’s a fantastic book to read if you want to learn about Pakistan’s history and present. His early years and Pakistan’s history are both included in his book. Beginning with his early years, he discusses his various interests, including cricket, politics, and philanthropy. He then moves on to other experiences that have shaped his opinions and thoughts. A detailed account of his struggles following his mother’s passing is provided. He is almost uninterested in politics, a cricket playboy who gives up rock and roll for a good cause, and in between, he marries Jemima before finally succeeding then breaks down is interesting to read.

The portion of the book that is revealed about his spiritual closeness to Allah is the best. He devotes a lot of his writing to spirituality and the heart of religion. It was none other than the renowned poet and philosopher Muhammad Iqbal who most influenced Khan. He analyses the ideas of the great Iqbal and assesses the best way for Islam to function in society.

It is clear that Khan wants to express his ideas about what he believes Pakistan should be. How to get there is up for debate, but the writing style is interesting. Because Imran Khan’s perspective hasn’t altered even the slightest bit, you get the impression when reading the book that it was released in 2020. Khan, who strangely has been heavily involved in politics for the past 20 years, never misses an opportunity to disparage Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif while also undermining himself by presenting various incidents. He blames Bhutto and Sharif for lacking political and leadership experience prior to taking office, although he later admits that he also lacked both of those things He lacks political experience as well, but his vision for his nation is clear: a welfare state for the populace.

Finally, because Imran Khan will become the Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in 2018, I’d be curious to see a follow-up about how his beliefs have been able to affect life in Pakistan given that his political slogan, “Naya Pakistan,” is buried somewhere beneath the echoes of NRO.

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