Convention (No. 105) concerning the abolition of forced labour

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The Convention (No. 105) concerning the abolition of forced labour is an international labor standard adopted by the International Labour Organization (ILO). It was initially adopted in 1957 and has been ratified by many countries around the world. However, please note that as an AI language model, I can provide general information about the convention, but I don’t have access to the most recent updates or specific details beyond my knowledge cutoff in September 2021.

The purpose of Convention No. 105 is to eradicate and abolish all forms of forced or compulsory labor. It defines forced labor as any work or service that is exacted from individuals under the threat of a penalty and for which they have not offered themselves voluntarily. This includes situations such as slavery, debt bondage, and human trafficking.

The convention requires member states to take effective measures to prevent and eliminate forced labor within their territories. These measures include enacting legislation, implementing policies, and establishing enforcement mechanisms to detect, investigate, and punish violations of the prohibition against forced labor. The convention also emphasizes the importance of providing appropriate remedies and support for victims of forced labor.

Member states that ratify the convention are required to submit periodic reports to the ILO detailing the measures they have taken to implement its provisions. The reports allow for monitoring and evaluation of the progress made by member states in eradicating forced labor.

It’s worth noting that since my knowledge is not up-to-date, I cannot provide information on specific ratifications or recent developments related to the convention. For the most accurate and recent information on the status of Convention No. 105 and its implementation, I recommend referring to the official documents and resources of the International Labour Organization or other authoritative sources.

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